Imagines (Spain), January 1994

Keanu Reeves

Exotic Rebel

(Translated from Spanish by keanugirl76, translation edited by Anakin McFly)

by José Luis López

For many years, as a young actor, he has taken many risks by playing complicated roles. He’s charming and cool. He’s innocent in an impossibile way and a bit of a rebel at the same time. Thanks to these qualities, he attracts both bashers and lovers. One of the main spokesmen of what the American critics defined as “X Generation”, Keanu Reeves is, together with Christian Slater, Brad Pitt, Johnny Depp and the departed River Phoenix, a perfect transposition of his own name… Cold wind of the mountains.

At the beginning of the 80s, John Hughes, Coppola and a series of illuminated directors, set up with intelligence a generation of actors that was called the Brat Pack. Ten years later, and in independent ways, another generation group erupted with strength and nerve in the international movie-industry sector. If the Brat Pack owned a healthy and hard-working (that then revealed to be fake) image, the Reeves’ band is another story. Phoenix died in alarming circumstances, Slater has just recovered from his problems with alcohol, Depp manages clubs and has his body tattooed, Pitt is busy with his love affairs, and, finally, Reeves speeds up his Norton Commando 850 along Hollywood roads and plays the part of a drug addict, a male prostitute or Buddha.

Born in Beirut (Lebanon) on September 2nd 1964, Keanu Reeves, since he started acting, has shown admirable voracity and precision. Son of an English mother and a Hawaiian father of Chinese origins, Reeves already had this artistic vocation at 15. After travelling across Australia and the USA, his family settled down in Toronto, Canada, where he attended acting classes and played in the local stage company and, finally, in the TV series Hanging In.

“I think that one of the reasons I became an actor was travelling. I love it. To be a day here, another there, and keep on doing different things. To be able to fly to Paris, London, Munich, Kathmandu, Buthan; to shoot in a 17th century Italian “villa”; to get lost in a small village in Nepal and, above all, to be different persons in different places, people that are not you but that, some way, turn themselves into you. What I don’t like is popularity and all the nonsense you have to deal with just for the fact that you live and work in Hollywood. During an interview, I realize that I like talking about my job and all that is related to it, and not about things like my dreams and the kind of girl I prefer”.

After some low-profile movies, Keanu Reeves began to be slightly noticed in River's Edge and Youngblood co-starring with Patrick Swayze and Rob Lowe, until Stephen Frears gave him the first great opportunity in Dangerous Liaisons where he played the elegant gentleman Danceny. From then on, every other actor – after belonging to such a cast – would have taken advantage of it, especially because his attractive innocence was one of the reasons the producers and the various head-hunters already hung around him. But Reeves was different and preferred to go on playing in movies that he was really interested in, such as The Night Before, a sort of surrealist comedy like After Hours; Permanent Record, a drama directed by Marisa Silver, in which Reeves played Chris, a boy affected by a close friend’s suicide; or The Prince of Pennsylvania, a bitter-sweet comedy with brilliant moments, in which Reeves’ way of dressing anticipated his boasted grunge style.

“I don’t think that an actor’s career should be based on a specific programme, like how to become famous in five lessons. I was interested in playing committed characters and working with people with something to say. For instance, the story of Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure is nonsense, but it keeps on amusing. On the other hand, I’m fond of Shakespeare and I love soliloquies. I read Shakespeare and I recite him aloud, which doesn’t imply that I cannot do other sorts of things on screen, though they might seem idiotic. It’s more than ten years since I started this job that makes me go nuts. My genuine happiness comes from a shooting or on a set. My fictional life, that of my characters, affects me as much as my personal life does with them.”

In specific, one of the movies Reeves refers to in his declarations is Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, which had a sequel and, quite unexpectedly, launched him towards popularity. The movie, a comedy in which two boys travel across time in a phone box, in 1989 in the USA became such an authentic social phenomenon that a famous North American cereal brand put into boxes puppets resembling the two characters. This was not appreciated by the protagonists, but anyway it was part of the huge marketing that is typical of Hollywood. After this particular stage, where he was directed by Stephen Frears, Keanu Reeves was ready to undertake major tasks, such as Ron Howard’s Parenthood, in the role of the eccentric boyfriend of Martha Plimpton (one of River Phoenix’s real love affairs) and I Love You To Death, as Hurt’s drug-addicted companion and perfectly directed by Lawrence Kasdan. In 1990, his odd image, that of portraying disturbed and different guys, would change radically with his two next works (apart from the above-mentioned Bill & Ted sequel). At first, in the role of a young journalist in Tune in Tomorrow - based on a Mario Vargas Llosa’s novel - co-starring the beautiful Barbara Hershey; then, co-starring with Patrick Swayze – in the part of Johnny Utah, a policeman that infiltrates into a surfer gang in Point Break. His good reputation before filming Kathryn Bigelow’s exciting thriller was so great that, in the contract he signed, his agent wanted his name to be placed in credits and posters parallel to Patrick Swayze’s one and not after, as the movie industry rules would require.

“He’s one of my favourite characters. On the contrary, I don’t like Jonathan Harker in “Dracula”. Though he’s a good character, I played it really bad. Johnny Utah is a guy that evolves during the story. At first he’s an idealist, then a practical man pursuing an aim. It’s like passing from youth to adulthood.”

Johnny Utah, who at first was going to have been played by Johnny Depp or Matthew Modine before Keanu Reeves took the role, is perhaps the character that helped him to reach definite success. And when it seemed that he had become a consecrated star, he rediscovered his wild side, where instinct prevails over reason, and fitted perfectly in the role of the magnificent Scott Favor in Gus Van Sant’s My Own Private Idaho, an authentic tour de force co-starring his good friend River Phoenix.

“River and I met on the set of I Love You to Death and we got at ease with each other at once. We had a lot of fun wandering and telling stories. It was just when shooting that movie that we got the script of My Own Private Idaho. After eagerly reading it, we were fascinated and, one night, as we were driving across Fairfax in Hollywood, I remember that it was more or less half past midnight and I asked him: “So, are you going to shoot it or not?”, and he answered me: “I don’t know. I’ll do it if you do it.” So I said: ”Ok, let’s do it”. So we met on the set of My Own Private Idaho. Really, if River hadn’t done it, I wouldn't have done it either. It was a movie that fitted both of us. The script was wonderful and, though many people got scandalized, however, neither River nor I thought we would consider any images of respectability or any brand. River Phoenix was exceptional, incredible, an authentic guy and a genius, so it’s for these reasons that I get angry when I read nonsense in magazines. Just
for commercial aims.
"

Acclaimed by the crtitics, especially the Europeans who are so used to such productions, My Own Private Idaho revealed Keanu Reeves’ dualism and the facility with which he turns himself into unsociable, symptomatic, full of shades characters. Thanks to this dualism, Kenneth Branagh chose him for his Shakespearean Much Ado About Nothing, where Reeves plays the part of Don John, Don Pedro (Denzel Washington)’s stepbrother. It’s just Branagh that defines, as nobody else ever did before, Keanu Reeves’ personality and the reasons he chose him.

“I like the actors who take some risks with their roles and are willing to play different roles in every new movie. Actors with both a vigorous and timorous character, which is what a Shakespearean text requires. When I met Keanu, I was impressed by his enthusiasm and curiosity. Moreover, Keanu Reeves is a very passionate person and there are two advantages in working with him. He fits you and your way of working, including the fact that he knows what you want from him even before you tell him, and he struggles proudly to impose his points of view if this helps to improve your story….”

Branagh doesn’t save any praise for who has become one of the most high-esteemed young actors in Hollywood, and neither does Reeves when talking about some of the directors he worked with.

“River and I met on the set of I Love You to Death and we got at ease with each other at once. We had a lot of fun wandering and telling stories. It was just when shooting that movie that we got the script of My Own Private Idaho. After eagerly reading it, we were fascinated and, one night, as we were driving across Fairfax in Hollywood, I remember that it was more or less half past midnight and I asked him: “So, are you going to shoot it or not?”, and he answered me: “I don’t know. I’ll do it if you do it.” So I said: ”Ok, let’s do it”. So we met on the set of My Own Private Idaho. Really, if River hadn’t done it, I wouldn’have done it either. It was a movie that fitted both of us. The script was wonderful and, though many people got scandalized, however, neither River nor I thought we would consider any images of respectability or any brand. River Phoenix was exceptional, incredible, an authentic guy and a genius, so it’s for these reasons that I get angry when I read nonsense in magazines. Just for commercial aims.”

Acclaimed by the crtitics, especially the Europeans who are so used to such productions, My Own Private Idaho revealed Keanu Reeves’ dualism and the facility with which he turns himself into unsociable, symptomatic, full of shades characters. Thanks to this dualism, Kenneth Branagh chose him for his Shakespearean Much Ado About Nothing, where Reeves plays the part of Don John, Don Pedro (Denzel Washington)’s stepbrother. It’s just Branagh that defines, as nobody else ever did before, Keanu Reeves’ personality and the reasons he chose him.

“I like the actors who take some risks with their roles and are willing to play different roles in every new movie. Actors with both a vigorous and timorous character, which is what a Shakespearean text requires. When I met Keanu, I was impressed by his enthusiasm and curiosity. Moreover, Keanu Reeves is a very passionate person and there are two advantages in working with him. He fits you and your way of working, including the fact that he knows what you want from him even before you tell him, and he struggles proudly to impose his points of view if this helps to improve your story….”

Branagh doesn’t save any praise for who has become one of the most high-esteemed young actors in Hollywood, and neither does Reeves when talking about some of the directors he worked with.

“Kenneth is an exuberant, intelligent, energetic man. The more I worked with him, the more I liked him. Regarding Gus Van Sant, he’s a lovely, very creative man. He has a huge sense of humor and he’s very respectful towards all aspects of the human experience. About Coppola, I can just say that he’s full of ideas and he’s a person who enjoys the simple pleasures of life. He lives to work and vice versa, and he’s always inventing and writing down things.”

After appearing in Coppola’s Dracula and getting a small cameo as Julian Gitche, a Mohawk Indian who falls in love with Uma Thurman in Gus Van Sant’s Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Keanu Reeves took one of the roles that surely will mark his life and career forever: indeed, to act in Bernardo Bertolucci’s Little Buddha is not a chance that everybody gets.

“Bernardo called me and told me that he had liked my work in My Own Private Idaho and that he wanted to meet me. So we met in a hotel in New York and, from the first moment, he started talking about his project. I didn’t know the young Prince Siddhartha’s story, but I got fascinated by his [Bernardo] way of telling stories and the passion with which he tried to share his emotions with me. At that time he was looking for a Hindu actor to play that character. After leaving him, I went to Italy to shoot Much Ado About Nothing. I took with me some books about Buddha in case something would happen. Then, I met Bernardo again a couple of times in Rome and then, finally, I got a phone call in which he asked me if I wanted to play his character. I screamed with joy.”

Preparing for that role has been one of the most difficult challenges that Keanu Reeves had to face. “Not physically, but psychologically, especially because one wonders how he can make this fairy tale believable by playing that role in an honest and worthy way." Moreover, Reeves confesses that the filming of Little Buddha has changed his life, his conception of things, his way of dealing with all that surrounds him.

“A short time before filming, we went to India. I remember that, along the Ganges, I saw my first cremation. I could observe how the dead’s family piled up wood on a pyre on which a woman’s body was burning. Around it, there were children playing with dogs, men running after animals, happiness, sadness, the hard show of life. I felt something about the cycle of existence…birth-death-birth-death and I realized that in the Western world we always try to hide the vision of death. It’s like shit: we realize it exists, but we have sewers to hide it. People don’t want to see either shit or death. Maybe for this reason, some incidents happened during the filming. Some religious sects threw stones against us and there were some protests along the streets in Nepal. I suppose that it happened because some Western people were telling a story belonging to Eastern people.”

Keanu Reeves wanted everything to result perfectly, so he worked hard to prepare his character as he never did before.

“I studied a lot, I read the Four Noble Truths, I met various religious men, spiritual advisers, in order to learn the Buddhist principles. For several weeks, I lived in isolation in a temple, drinking just water and eating just oranges. Bernardo kept on telling me: “Be careful, Buddhism is the negation of the Ego.” I think that now I feel far better about all that surrounds me, as if I felt a sort of superior energy that, when the Keanu identity abandons this body, it will change and transform. When you get the chance of playing a role like this, in a country like this, and surrounded by people like this, your scale of values changes radically. What impressed me most with the script is how a person can do great things through such a simple approach to the emotions and the intuition of people and things. I also think that movies are made of this.”

For Bertolucci, Keanu Reeves has just words of gratitude and admiration about his work as a director and his behaviour as a person.

“He’s a teacher. He’s sky and earth at the same time. Or, better, he’s a rainbow that links both, since he’s a poet, a painter and an intellectual. He’s very rational, but also very affectionate. I think that, among the directors I worked with, the one more similar to him is Gus Van Sant, because of his sensitivity. Bernardo is the voice, the animation, the noise; Gus is silence and tranquillity. Bernardo directs a lot, Gus lets you act, he prefers osmosis. But I’m terribly proud to have worked with two creators like them.”

After Little Buddha, Keanu Reeves changed genres completely and got involved in the first feature film of Jan De Bont(director of photography of Basic Instict and Lethal Weapon 3). Its provisional title is Speed.

“It’s an action movie where I play the part of a cop involved in the kidnapping of a bus full of hostages. I wanted to change Buddha’s tranquillity into something more dynamic. An actor must pursue diversity and act both in a “serious” movie, produced by a big studio, and in a non-pretentious comedy filmed by an independent director. I think that my balance as an actor and as a person consists in practising this freedom in choosing projects. Though of course you may make mistakes. Moreover, you have always to pursue interesting roles. In Hollywood, there is a traditional mentality that never provides the movie industry with something new. There are rules even to know what a character must do or say and to tell stories, and this issue leads us to a bothering conformity. Some keep on thinking that movies are business, while some others want them to be art. It’s complicated to find a combination.”

It’s clear that Keanu Reeves knows what he wants and he’s willing, like his companions of that generation, not to lose a seat in the Hollywood stardom. But, unlike the others, he does it with effective strikes, apparently without any effort. He makes people lose his trail, he starts back, he surprises, he’s not influenced by any fashions, he shows up just when he’s required to, but, like a wild animal, he doesn’t allow anybody to tame him. About his private life, he lets us know just what he want us to know. We know that he reads Dostoievski, that he’s in love with Shakespeare, that he had a love affair with Paula Abdul (the choreographer and singer that is now married to Emilio Estévez), that he works on his voice, that he likes improvising, and above all - considering the several scars he doesn’t like to show - that he’s fond of speed and bikes.

“I love feeling the wind and I have a very simple rule: I never let anybody before me, so that I won’t be hit by them… Then, once you are alone on the road, you can start driving slowly.”

These words, said by an actor whose name is full of vowels, sound like the metaphor of his career.



In its original Spanish:

Keanu Reeves

Rebelde y exotico

by José Luis López

Lleva varios años jugándose el tipo en papeles complicados para un actor joven. Tiene encanto, frescura, un punto de inocencia desarmante y un toque rebelde que conquista por ígual a detractores y admiradores. Máximo exponente de lo que los críticos norteamericanos han definido como "Generación X", Keanu Reeves es junto a Christian Slater, Brad Pítt, Johnny Depp y el fallecido River Phoeníx, una perfecta transposición de su propio nombre... Brisa fresca sobre las montañas.

Aprincipios de los 80, John Hughes, Coppola y una serie de directores luminosos, orquestaron con buena ciencia una generación de actoras que por entonces se dio en llamar Brat Pack. Diez años después y de manera independiente y por distintas vías, otro grupo generacional ha tomado el relevo irrumpiendo con fuerza y descaro en el panorama cinematográfico internacional. Si el Brat Pack poseía una imagen sana y aplicada (que posteriormente se reveló como ficticia), la banda de Reeves es otra historia. Phoenix ha muerto en circunstancias alarmantes, Slater ya se ha recuperado de sus problemas de alcohol, Depp dirige clubs y se tatúa el cuerpo, Pitt encandila con su amoríos y finalmente Reeves igual monta su Norton Commando 850 a toda pastilla por los aledaños de Hollywood que interpreta a un colgado, a un chapero o a Buda.

Nacido en Beirut (Líbano) el 2 de septiembre de 1964, Keanu Reeves ha demostrado, desde que se inició como intérprete , una voracidad y un afán de superación encomiables. Hijo de madre inglesa y padre hawaiano con sangre china, Reeves ya tenía vocación artística a los quince años. Tras viajar por Australia y Estados Unidos, la familia se instaló en Canadá y en la ciudad de Toronto, Keanu Reeves tomó clases de interpretación, actuó en montajes deteatro locales y debutó en la serie televisiva Hanging In.

«Creo que una de las cosas por las que me decidí a ser actor es por los viajes. Adoro viajar. Estar un día aquí y otro allá, hacer constantemente cosas diferentes. Poder volar a París, a Londres, a Munich, a Katmandú, a Buthan, rodar en una villa italiana del siglo XVII, perderte en un pueblecito de Nepal y sobre todo ser diferentes personas en diferentes lugares, personas que no son tú pero que en cierto modo se convierten en ti. Lo que ya no me gusta tanto es la popularidad y las estupideces que tienes que hacer por el hecho de vivir y trabajar en Hollywood. En las entrevistas reconozco que lo que de verdad me gusta es hablar de mi trabajo, de cómo he disfrutado haciéndolo y no de cosas como: ¿Qué sueños tiene o qué tipo de chicas le gustan?»

Tras pasar a la pantalla grande con películas de bajo presupuesto, Keanu Reeves empezó a despuntar tímidamente en River's Edge (en vídeo: Instinto sádico) y Forja de campeones al lado de Patrick Swayze y Rob Lowe hasta que su primera gran oportunidad le vino de la mano de Stephen Frears en Las amistades peligrosas donde encarnaría al apuesto caballero Danceny. A partir de ese momento cualquier otro actor habiendo participado en un casting de esas características hubiese aprovechado el tirón, máxime cuando su atractivo candor era una de las bazas a jugar por los productores y cazatalentos varios que ya le rondaban. Pero Reeves era diferente y prefirió proseguirsu camino embarcándose en una serie de títulos que le apetecían como The Night Before, una especie de comedia surrealista en la línea de Jo, qué noche; Permanent Record, un drama firmado por Marisa Silver en el que Reeves interpretaba a Chris, un muchacho afectado por el suicidio de un íntimo amigo o The Prince of Pennsylvania, una comedia agridulce c

on momentos brillantes en los que el vestuario de Keanu Reeves anticipaba ya la cacareada moda grunge.

«No creo que la carrera de un actor debe estar basada en un programa específico de cómo llegar a la fama en cinco lecciones. A mí me apetecía interpretar personajes enrollados y trabajar con gente que tuviese algo que decir. Por ejemplo la historia de "Las alucinantes aventuras de Billy y Ted" es una perfecta estupidez pero no por ello deja de ser divertida. Por otra parte, a mí me apasiona Shakespeare, me encantan los soliloquios. Leo a Shakespeare, recito en voz alta a Shakespeare, lo que no implica no poder hacer otro tipo de cosas en pantalla por muy idiotas que parezcan. Llevo más de diez años volcado en una profesión que me vuelve loco. Mi auténtica felicidad brota durante un rodaje o encima de un escenario. Mi vida de ficción, la de mis personajes, me alimenta en la medida que mi vida personal lo hace también con ellos.»

Precisamente una de las películas a las que se refiere Reeves en sus declaraciones... Las alucinantes aventuras de Billy y Ted (que posteriormente han tenido una segunda parte), le supusieron al actor un trampolín inesperado hacia la popularidad. La película, una comedía en la que dos jóvenes viajan a través del tiempo en una cabina telefónica, se convirtió en Estados Unidos allá por 1989 en un auténtico fenómeno social hasta el punto de que una famosa marca norteamericana de cereales incluyó en las cajas muñecos que representaban a los dos personajes, algo que no gustó demasiado a sus protagonistas pero que forma parte del imparable merchandising publicitario que despliega Hollywood. Después de esa etapa tan particular y de haber trabajado en las órdenes de Stephen Frears, Keanu Reeves estaba preparado para apuntarse a empresas mayores como lo demuestra su participación en Dulce hogar... a veces de Ron Howard en el papel del estrafalario novio de Martha Plimpton (una de las relaciones sentimentales de River Phoenix) y en Te amaré hasta que te mate, haciendo de compinche drogata de William Hurt, y dirigido a la perfección por Lawrence Kasdan. En 1990, su imagen de tipo extraño, especializado en tipos algo desquiciados y diferentes, cambiaría radicalmente con sus dos trabajos siguientes (excepción hecha de la ya comentada segunda parte de las aventuras de Billy y Ted). Por una parte su papel de joven periodista en Tune of Tomorrow, al lado de la hermosa Barbara Hershey y basado en una novela de Mario Vargas Llosa, y por otra, el excelente trabajo que desarrolló como Johnny Utah, el poli que se infiltra en una banda de surfistas en Le llaman Bodhi al lado de Patrick Swayze. La buena reputación como actor que precedía a Keanu Reeves antes de rodar el trepidante thriller de Kathryn Bigelow era tal que en el contrato que firmó, su agente exigió que su nombre figurase en los créditos y carteles publicitarios paralelo al de Patrick Swayze, no después, como hubiesen exigido los cánones del estrellato.

«Es uno de mis personajes preferidos. Así como no me gusta el Jonathan Harker de "Dracula" y no es que no sea un buen personaje, es que yo lo hago realmente mal. Johnny Utah es un tipo que evoluciona durante la historia. Pasa de ser un idealista a ser un hombre práctico que se marca un objetivo, algo así como pasar de la adolescencia a la madurez.»

Johnny Utah, personaje para el que sonaban nombres como Johnny Depp o Matthew Modine antes de que se lo quedara Keanu Reeves, fue quizás el que le ayudó a despegar definitivamente. Y cuando parecía que ya era una estrella con todos los pronunciamientos, Reeves rebuscó en su lado salvaje, en esa faceta de su personalidad en la que prima el instinto sobre la razón y se descolgó con el magnífico personaje de Scott Favor en Mi Idaho privado de Gus Van Sant, un auténtico tourde force en el que compartiría cartelera con su buen amigo River Phoenix.

«River y yo nos conocimos durante el rodaje de "Te amaré hasta que te mate" y simpatizamos en seguida. Nos divertíamos muchísimo vagabundeando y contándonos historias. Precisamente durante ese rodaje nos llegó a los dos el guión de "Mi Idaho privado". La verdad es que después de leerlo con avidez nos quedamos alucinados y una noche mientras íbamos en coche por Fairfax camino de Hollywood, recuerdo que debían ser más o menos las doce y media de la noche, le pregunté: "¿Bueno, vas a hacer la película o no?" y me contestó: "No lo sé. La hago si tú la haces" y volví a contestarle: "Vale, pues la hacemos". Y así nos encontramos sobre el "set" de "Mi Idaho privado". realmente si River no la hubiese hecho yo tampoco. Era una película para nosotros dos. El guión era maravilloso y aunque hubo gente que se escandalizó, lo cierto es que ni River ni yo pensábamos que tuviésemos que guardar apariencias de respetabilidad o imagen de marca. River Phoenix era una persona excepcional increíble, un tipo auténtico y genial, por eso me da asco lo que publican los periódicos últimamente. Eso sólo para vender papel.»

Aclamada por la crítica, sobre todo por la europea, algo habitual en producciones de esas características, Mi Idaho privado reveló la dualidad de Keanu Reeves, la facilidad que tiene para transformarse en personajes asociales, sintomáticos, llenos de matices, precisamente es dualidad fue la que dio pie a Kenneth Branagh a contar con él para su shakespeariana Mucho ruido y pocas nueces en laque Reeves interpreta a Don Juan, hermanastro de Don Pedro (Denzel Washington). El propio Branagh define como nadie la personalidad de Keanu Reeves y los motivos de su elección.

«Me gustan los actores que se arriesgan con sus papeles, que tienen ese apetito especial para realizar trabajos muy diferentes a cada nueva película en la que se implican, actores con carácter vigoroso y asustadizo a la vez que en definitiva es lo que demanda un texto shakespeariano. Cuando conocí a Keanu me impresionó en seguida su entusiasmo y su curiosidad. Además Keanu Reeves es una persona muy apasionada y tiene dos ventajas a la hora de trabajar con él. Se adapta a ti y se adapta a tu forma de trabajar, incluso sabe lo que quieres de él antes de que se lo digas y lucha con fiereza por imponer sus puntos de vista si eso ayuda a mejorar la historia que estás contando..»

Branagh no escatima elogios para quien se ha convertido en uno de los jóvenes actores más cotizados de Hollywood, como no lo hace Reeves tampoco a la hora de opinar sobre algunos de los directores con los que ha trabajado.

«Kenneth es un hombre exuberante, inteligente, dotado de una enorme energía, cuanto más trabajaba con él más me gustaba. Por su parte Gus Van Sant es un hombre amable, muy creativo, con un gran sentido del humor y además muy respetuoso con todo tipo de experiencias humanas. De Coppola sólo puedo decir que es una persona con la cabeza repleta de montones de ideas, una persona que disfruta de los placeres sencillos de la vida, un hombre que hace de su trabajo su propia vida y viceversa y que además está inventando cosas y escribiendo siempre.»

Tras aparecer en el Drácula de Coppola y hacer un pequeño cameo interpretando a Julian Gitche, un indio Mohawk asmático que se enamora de Uma Thurman a Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, de Gus Van Sant, Keanu Reeves se ha atrevido con uno de los papeles que a buen seguro marcarán su vida y su carrera. Interpretar El pequeño Buda para Bernardo Bertolucci no está al alcance de cualquiera.

«Bernardo me llamó, me dijo que le había gustado mi trabajo en "Mi Idaho privado" y que quería conocerme. Quedamos pues en un hotel de Nueva York y desde el primer momento me empezó a hablar de su proyecto. No tenía ni idea de la historia del joven príncipe Siddhartha pero me quedé fascinado por su facilidad para narrar historias y la manera en que intentaba compartir conmigo sus emociones. Por entonces estaba buscando un actor hindú para interpretar al personaje. Por lo que nos despedimosyyo mefui a Italia a rodar "Mucho ruido y pocas nueces". Eso sí, me llevé para leer varios libros sobre Buda por si acaso. Luego volví a ver a Bernardo un par de veces más en Roma y finalmente una llamada telefónica en la que me preguntó si aceptaba ser su personaje. Grité de alegría.»

Prepararse para el papel ha sido uno de los retos más difíciles con los que se ha tenido que enfrentar Keanu Reeves. «No físicamente, sino psicológicamente, comenta el actor, sobre todo porque uno se pregunta de qué manera puede hacer creíble esta fábula interpretando de forma honesta y digna». Reeves además confiesa que el rodaje de El pequeño Buda ha cambiado su vida, su concepción de las cosas, la manera de entender todo lo que le rodea.

«Poco antes del rodaje hicimos un viaje a la India. Recuerdo que al borde del Ganges, vi mi primera cremación. Pude observar cómo los familiares del muerto apilaban madera en una hoguera en la que se estaba calcinando el cuerpo de una mujer. Y alrededor los niños jugando con los perros, hombres persiguiendo animales, alegría, tristeza, el puñetero circo de la vida. Sentí algo del ciclo de la existencia... nacimiento-muerte-nacimiento-muerte y me di cuenta de que en Occidente hacemos todo lo posible por ocultar la visión de la muerte. Es como la mierda, sabemos que está ahí pero tenemos las alcantarillas para esconderla. La gente no quiere ver ni la mierda ni la muerte. Quizá por eso hubo algunos incidentes durante el rodaje. Algunas sectas religiosas nos tiraron piedras, hubo alguna protesta en las calles de Nepal. Supongo que era por que unos occidentales estaban contando una historia que les pertenecía a ellos.»

Keanu Reeves quería que todo saliese a la perfección por lo que se aplicó a preparar su personaje como nunca antes lo había hecho.

«Estudié mucho, leí las Cuatro Nobles Verdades, me reuní con varios religiosos, consejeros "espirituales", para aprender preceptos budistas. Estuve durante varias semanas aislado en un templo alimentándome sólo de agua y naranjas. Bernardo me decía constantemente: "Cuidado, el Budismo es la negación del yo, la negación del ego". Creo que ahora me siento mucho más receptivo con respecto a todo lo que me rodea, algo así como si yo mismo sintiese que hay una especie de energía superior que permitirá que cuando la identidad del Keanu actual abandone este cuero, cambie y se transforme. Cuando uno tiene la suerte de hacer un papel como ése, en un país como ése y rodeado de gente como ésa, su escala de valores cambia radicalmente. Lo que me impresionó del guión es cómo una persona puede hacer cosas grandiosas mediante un acercamiento tan sencillo a las emociones y a la intuición de las personas y las cosas. Yo creo que el cine es también un poco eso.»

Para Bertolucci, Keanu Reeves sólo tiene palabras de agradecimiento y de admiración por su trabajo como cineasta y su comportamiento como persona.

«Es un maestro. Es el cielo y la tierra a la vez. O más bien es un arco iris que une ambas cosas ya que es poeta, pintor, intelectual. Es una persona muy cerebral pero a la vez muy afectiva. Creo que de los directores con los que ha trabajado el que más se le acerca es Gus Van Sant por su gran sensibilidad. Bernardo es la voz, la animación, el ruido; Gus es el silencio, la tranquilidad. Bernardo dirige mucho, Gus por el contrario deja hacer, utiliza la ósmosis, pero estoy terriblemente orgulloso de haber trabajado con dos creadores como ellos.»

Después de El pequeño Buda, Keanu Reeves ha cambiado completamente de registro y se ha embarcado en el primer largometraje de Jan de Bont (director de fotografía de Instinto básico y Arma letal 3), cuyo título provisional es Speed.

«Es una película de acción en la que interpreto a un policía envuelto en el secuestro de un autobús con rehenes de por medio. Me apetecía trocar la tranquilidad del personaje de Buda por algo más movidito. Un actor debe buscar la diversidad, estar tanto en una película digamos "seria" producida por un gran estudio o dejarse caer por una comedia sin pretensiones y rodada por un independiente. Creo que mi equilibrio como actor y como individuo reside en ejercitar esa libertad de elegir los proyectos. Aunque por supuesto se cometen errores. Además, los papeles interesantes hay que rebuscarlos cada día más. En Hollywood tienen una mentalidad tradicional que no aporta nada nuevo al cine. Hay códigos para saber lo que debe hacer o decir tal personaje, para contar las historias y eso nos lleva a un convencionalismo aburrido. Los hay que siguen pensando que el cine es un negocio y los hay que quieren hacer de él un arte, lo complicado es encontrar el término medio.»

Está claro que Keanu Reeves sabe lo que quiere y está dispuesto, como le ocurre a sus compañeros de generación, a no dejarse arrebatar un puesto en el Olimpo de Hollywood. Sólo que él lo hace a golpe de efectos, aparentemente sin esfuerzos, despistando, volviendo a empezar, sorprendiendo, desmarcándose de las modas, dejándose ver cuando se le requiere, pero como un animalillo salvaje no dejándose domar. De su vida privada sólo se sabe lo que que él quiere que sesepa. Se sabe que lee a Dostoievski, que es un enamorado de Shakespeare, que tuvo una relación sentimental con Paula Abdul (la coreógrafa y cantante casada con Emilio Estévez), que trabaja su voz, que le gusta improvisar y, sobre todo y a juzgar por las numerosas cicatrices que no le gusta exhibir, que le apasionan la velocidad y las motos.

«Me encanta sentir el viento y tengo una norma muy sencilla, nunca dejo que haya alguien delante de mí, es la única manera de no dejar que te golpeen... Una vez que estás solo en la carretera ya puedes rodar despacio.»

Estas palabras de un actor cuyo nombre está plagado de vocales suena a metáfora de su propia carrera.




Article Focus:

Little Buddha

Tagged:

Little Buddha , Speed , My Own Private Idaho , Hangin' In , River's Edge , Youngblood , Dangerous Liaisons , Night Before, The , Permanent Record , Prince of Pennsylvania, The , Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure , Parenthood , I Love You to Death , Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey , Tune in Tomorrow... , Point Break , Much Ado About Nothing , Even Cowgirls Get the Blues , Articles Translated from Spanish




You need to be a member to leave comments. Click here to register.