WINM Forums :: Off-Topic Chat :: Advice on colleges?

Advice on colleges?
Spirit
2015-06-08 04:52:54


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I was just wondering if anyone here had any advice to offer on choosing a college? I know I still have a few years but time really does go fast (as I learned this year. I still remember procrastinating on this site to avoid getting ready for my first day, and now I only have three days left) and I could use the help. Any little tid-bits of info or anything is of use!
silver
2015-06-08 09:28:54


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Firstly it is great that your are preparing early. Secondly, it starts with you. What do you want to do? For a career? For a hobby? Where do you want to live? At your hometown, or some place else? What does your finances look like? Do you have any scholarships lined up in any particular institution? Would you rather learn a trade or experience in technology? How are your grades?

Don't overwhelm yourself, but try not to procrastinate either. Take the proper time to dip your toe in the pool before you go in. Colleges will practically jump up to give you a tour, because you are potential business. Not to sound cynical or anything, but colleges are a business before anything else.

I didn't visit many colleges before I went, but I did do College Prep, so I took some college level courses for like 2 summers. You see, I had gotten myself into a bind, because of how I was thinking back then. I thought I would apply to about 5 colleges, and which ever one accepted me, boom I'd go there. I didn't count on the chance that I'd be accepted in to all five, so I had to make a decision. xp. So yeah I am an indecisive person. That's why I say look at what you like, and your stability first. I settled on a school that provided me with mass communications, theatre, martial arts, close to home, and was the least expensive at about 18,000 (per year I think). I got to experience all that I wanted to.

Lastly,(If I haven't talked too much already), connect with your school's counselor, and the counselors in the schools to which you wish to apply. Many people like initiative, and the ability to be personable. It'll take you far.

Misty2015-06-08 19:54:40


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By the end, there is no easy way to survive school. Difference lies between working hard in something you are passionate and not so passionate about. As I am talking now I am still writing my thesis (sorry for the inactivity). Nevertheless, being aware of our circumstances at the moment keeps our feet on the ground too. Perhaps it is better to make a list of our priorities. For example: interests, funding, prospect for future career, and also the flexibility of the study to be useful in various fields. When I started college, I took the subject which I hated most, accounting. But my parent had just been laid off at that time, so I choose not to become a burden and pick school that I can get a job fast. Of course it was a struggle. I don't recommend anyone to take this path unless they have no choice. But years, years, years later I got a scholarship so that now I can enrol for a graduate program (which I love) in a good university abroad. To put it short: Pick your own battle, patience is a virtue, and I hope you enjoy the journey ... which is not always made of linear paths
Spirit
2015-06-08 21:24:30


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Thanks silver & misty! See what I really want (and have every intention of achieving.. I'm both stubborn and persistent) to be is a film director, but I'm not really getting much support there from familial sources. Most local schools don't offer many majors related to the arts, and as far as finances go, it's most likely going to be just taking out loans and paying them back for the rest of my life, although I could probably get some scholarships for various things. I really want to do an exchange program in between high school and college though since I'm not allowed to now.
silver
2015-06-09 08:20:14


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film is very cool, but it is difficult to get in to. it is more of who knows you sort of thing. find a school that has a strong film program. get some internships, and start making your own projects (whether writing or filming). Try different styles of film as well, and try to find someone who is working in the area, where you want to be, and try to shadow them. You got this! and good luck.
Spirit
2015-06-10 07:40:16


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I would love to shadow someone in the field. I do find myself writing out the occasional outline of bits and pieces of screenplay ideas I have, and I just recently began to seriously work on a trilogy I've thought up, novelization first and screenplay adaptation second, mostly because I hope to have it published when completed (and edited countless times).

Of course the "realistic" and "practical" outcome of all of this that I have mostly for my family's sake is to be a mortician. Not really related in any way, but it gives me something to base my high school courses along, as well as a beautiful setting for anything in the horror category Also because I seem to get along better with the dead than the living. Heh. :-/

silver
2015-06-10 11:38:19


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that job will always be needed on the market XD so yeah learn all you can with that death stuff, because I would say most of us don't want to be around that.
MmeRenard
2015-06-19 04:43:19


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(Sorry) Spirit, do what you love! I won't say "and the money will follow" - but when you know what you love and work REALLY hard and NEVER give up, you WILL be successful. "Film" (well, "movies / cinema") is MUCH more accessible than it once was. But you need to LOVE it, to be able to handle setbacks and rejection with strength, to work really, really hard. If you can say "yes!" to all of those things, your heart is tugging you in that direction. For me, after six decades, my intuition (when I listen) has NEVER let me down - my intellect has often done so.

This is a GREAT topic! Thank you!

MmeRenard
2015-06-19 04:46:42


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And I wouldn't assume that college is necessary. If you're serious about film / movies / cinema, a pretty decent camera (as I understand it) is WAY less expensive than college, and if you shoot digital, you don't need to worry about the cost of film. Please, if this is a route that interests you enough, talk to someone who actually knows stuff - I'm nothing more than a dabbler.
becauseichooseto22
2015-06-19 05:17:09


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I agree with MmeRenard. When it comes to movie making, you either have talent or you don't. If I were you I would invest in a good camera, watch a lot of movies, read a ton of books on the art of film...
Some of the greatest film directors of all time never went to film school :) James Cameron used to work as a truck driver before he got a chance to do some 2nd unit directing, and the rest is history :)
MmeRenard
2015-06-19 06:39:20


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As a lifelong creative professional, I find that it's WAY less about talent (although, yes, a good eye is, I think, pretty essential) than about LOVE and PASSION for the work and a work ethic that is, well, "Superperfect!" And it's very true that many (and many more these days) directors don't go to film school. Or maybe go to film school a little bit and find out if it works for them - it might not. Or it might. There are good, helpful resources on the internet, you can talk to LOTS of people, read GOOD books and above all - notice your process - what works, what doesn't, and change your approach accordingly.
becauseichooseto22
2015-06-19 18:12:07


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You're right, Mme! A good work ethic is ABSOLUTELY essential and will take you far. That's one of the main reasons why I admire and respect Keanu so much! :)
Spirit
2015-06-22 08:54:33


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Thank you SO so much Mme and bicto22!! I've wanted to go into the movie making industry for years now, and those are really the first words of encouragement I've heard (well, read).

I was raised, in a way, believing college to be more of just further mandatory schooling than optional education for a career.

I do have a few different cameras I've been looking into trying to get over time, which will undoubtedly end up being digital, despite my love for traditional film, digital is more convenient.

Lately I've just been trying to balance out what I want to do with what is expected of me, not always the easiest thing.

MmeRenard
2015-06-23 00:16:22


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Really glad to help. When Side By Side came out, they recommended this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Cinematography-Fundamentals-Techniques-Workflows/dp/0240817915/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1434989590&sr=1-1&keywords=digital+cinematography&pebp=1434989599299&perid=00BJDXQQC5ERPGAR26B2

Not inexpensive but if Keanu and those filmmakers recommend it, it's the one book I'd buy. I haven't gotten it yet, but I plan to buy it.

Doing what's expected of us is always "easier" but doing what your heart calls you to do is, as Mary Oliver says in her beautiful poem "Summer Day" the right thing to do with your "one wild and precious life."

Spirit
2015-12-31 06:38:32


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Long time no post, but I got the Digital Cinematography book for Christmas, and I've found some colleges I've taken a liking to as well. Did you ever get it Mme?
MmeRenard
2015-12-31 07:19:49


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Oh my, I haven't gotten the book yet - I need to do that! It's lovely to hear from you. I'm delighted that you've found some colleges that you like. I've been playing with really lo-tech stuff, videos with my iPhone, toying with getting a prosumer camcorder, maybe a Lomo Kino. Really cheap, really fun.

Best of luck to you!

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